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Friday, 18 May 2012
Baroness Warsi: Some Pakistani men think young white girls are "fair game" for sex abuse
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From the London Evening Standard

Some Pakistani men believe “white girls are fair game” for sexual abuse, the Cabinet Minister and Tory co-chairman Baroness Warsi says today. In an exclusive interview Sayeeda Warsi, Britain’s most senior Muslim politician, calls on mosques and community leaders to condemn “a small minority” of their members with racist and sexist views.

“There is a small minority of Pakistani men who believe that white girls are fair game,” she told the Evening Standard. “And we have to be prepared to say that. You can only start solving a problem if you acknowledge it first.”

Lady Warsi is the most senior political leader to say publicly that racist and misogynistic attitudes in sections of the community were partly responsible for what happened. . . decided to break her silence on the controversy to encourage other leaders of the community to speak up and change attitudes.

“This small minority who see women as second class citizens, and white women probably as third class citizens, are to be spoken out against,” she said. “In mosque after mosque after mosque, this should be raised as an issue so that anybody who is remotely involved should start to feel that the community is turning on them . . . Communities have a responsibility to stand up and say, ‘This is wrong, this will not be tolerated’.”

Some critics insist the vulnerability of the girls themselves was more critical than race in the Rochdale case. Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons Home Affairs committee, said it was important not to “stigmatise a whole community”, adding: “I do not believe it is a race issue.”

However, Lady Warsi, who grew up in a Pakistani community in Yorkshire, said both race and misogyny played a part. She said: “These were grown men, some of them religious teachers, or running businesses, with young families of their own. They knew this was wrong. Whether or not these girls were easy prey, they knew it was wrong.”

Lady Warsi said she decided to speak out after her Pakistan-born father urged her: “Sayeeda, uniquely, you are in a position to show leadership on this issue.”

I disagree about the 'small minority'; I fear it is a fairly substantial minority. I also wonder how much this is genuine and how much damage limitation. But as she isn't wrong, and the bruvverz of MAC and suchlike have criticised her I'll give her the benefit of the doubt.

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Posted on 05/18/2012 6:14 AM by Esmerelda Weatherwax
Comments
18 May 2012
stephena55

 Yes, I too give her some credit for at least going half way to acknowledging the source of the problem. Race being largely contiguous with religion in this case. 

As Proud Kafir rightly suggests, there is a long way to go yet.

Perhaps if we do end up tackling this issue with the rigour required then we may even start to turn back the migratory flow, as muslims start to get the message.  That'll be the day.

Here's a Hugh-type comic interlude for fans of Spike Milligan in his prime.



18 May 2012
Proud_Kafir7908

How does Ms. Warsi propose that this issue be raised in every mosque, to give such muslims the feeling that their 'community' is turning on them? That would fly in the face of islamic cornerstones in relations between slaves of allah and infidel females, since it would mean preaching against sexual slavery, the taking of infidel women as war booty and their belief that penis-possessing muslims cannot be responsible for their actions in the presence of exposed female skin, among other basic islamic tenets.