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Monday, 30 September 2013
Al-Ghazali: Muslim Destroyer of Philosophy
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by Paul Austin Murphy (October 2013)


Introduction

Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali (c. 1058–1111) is often been referred to – by both Muslims and non-Muslims - as ‘the greatest Muslim after Muhammad’.

Avicenna and Averroes (still well-known in the West) were largely forgotten in the Muslim world but their influence in Europe was very strong. Ghazali, on the other hand, was more or less ignored in Europe yet his philosophy gained a supreme position in the Muslim world and it kept that position all the way to the 20th century and beyond. In other words, two important sustainers of philosophy were forgotten in the Muslim world, whereas the destroyer of philosophy (in his own words) gained an overwhelming hegemony.  more>>>

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Posted on 09/30/2013 12:00 AM by NER
Comments
1 Oct 2013
Send an emailPaul Austin Murphy
'

Hugh Fitzgerald:


"Not just Al-Ghazali, but also some of his solemn explicators and enthusiasts, for example Eric Ormsby, gored, to put it

punningly. "

I've never heard of of Eric Ormsby. Nonetheless, I see that his book is called Ghazali: The Revival of Islam. You can say that again! The revival of Islam and the death of philosophy (in the Muslim world).



30 Sep 2013
Hugh Fitzgerald
'Lord Harlech. Also known as David Ormsby-Gore. He of Camelot, the man who comforted Jackie, and produced five children, including a brace of rock-groupie daughters.

30 Sep 2013
Rebecca
'Hugh, I don't get it. What's the pun?

30 Sep 2013
Hugh Fitzgerald
'Not just Al-Ghazali, but also some of his solemn explicators and enthusiasts, for example Eric Ormsby, gored, to put it punningly.